LIGHTING WEEK: How to design a well-lit room.

Lighting is an essential ingredient in the design process of a room. Without realising it, lighting impacts your mood in a space, as well your level of comfort.  Think about how you feel when you walk into a doctor's surgery or supermarket? That abrupt, overexposed lighting makes you feel alert, awake and somewhat unsettled. In the alternative, the last place you ate dinner most likely used soft, diffused lighting to make you feel relaxed and cosy, which encouraged you to stay awhile. This is how transformative lighting can be and how integral it is to get right in your home.

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Image one.

Many of us fall victim to either excessive lighting or having a poorly-lit room. When the right balance is achieved, you don't notice it.  And that's how it should be. While there is no hard and fast rule that should be adopted, we want to share with you our secrets to a well-lit room.

Add a dimmer. Most, if not all our rooms, rely on a main central light source. For many, this is commonly through recessed down lights that usually overwhelm our space. To better control this source of lighting, especially in multi-purpose spaces, a dimmer is essential. Dimmers give you the flexibility to control the level of light in the room to create a mood and maximise the task at hand, depending on the time of day.

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Image two.

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Image three.

Set up task lighting. Where specific activities take place in our home, centralised, task lighting is required. In many of these rooms, we find that insufficient lighting is used. Common areas where task lighting is necessary include:

+ the kitchen, especially the counter top areas where you prepare meals.

+ the study, especially the desk area or where you browse for reading material on your shelves.

+ the bedroom, particular if you read (or work!) in bed as well as the wardrobe, where you shuffle through your clothing selection.

In these areas, concentrated, direct lighting is essential through the use of hanging pendant lights, floor or table lamps.  For some areas, lights with flexible arms may also be needed so you can manipulate your light source to assist as you move around in your space. 

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Image four.

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Image five.

Consider the mood of your space.  Not all our rooms require the same type of lighting as we use each area for a different purpose. For example, where we eat, a central overhead light on a dimmer that allows you to soften the light will create a more intimate, relaxed environment for dining. On the other hand, the bathroom may require a more direct source of lighting, especially around the vanity area. And for multi-purpose rooms, like the living room, various lighting options is optimal, like a combination of down lights, table and floor lamps for a desired layered effect.

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Image six.

Consider the space you are living in. Do you think you have optimised your lighting scheme? Let us know if any of these tips have helped you!

SbyD x

Image sources via: one / two / three / four / five / six.